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    3 Things to Know if You’re Arrested for Threatening Second Degree in Connecticut

    3 Things to Know if You’re Arrested for Threatening Second Degree in Connecticut
    • The crime of Threatening Second Degree / CGS 53a-62 in Connecticut is overly broad.
    • Threatening Second Degree in Connecticut can be a felony or a misdemeanor.
    • If you didn’t make a true threat, you can have a legit defense to your Threatening charge.
    • If you’ve been charged with Threatening Second Degree in Connecticut, an experienced criminal defense lawyer can help.


    What is Threatening Second Degree in Connecticut?

    Threatening Second Degree, which you can find at Connecticut criminal law § 53a-62, is incredibly broad. It prohibits you from using a physical threat to intentionally place or attempt to place another person in fear of imminent physical injury, or from threatening to commit a crime of violence against someone with the intent to, or with reckless disregard of the risk that it will terrorize them. For more on different degrees of threatening in Connecticut, click here.

    Second, is Threatening 2nd a Felony or a Misdemeanor in Connecticut? 

    That depends. Threatening Second Degree is a Class D Felony in Connecticut if the alleged victim – or the target of the threat – is in a building or on the grounds of a house of religious worship or religiously-affiliated center, a school, or a daycare center. Otherwise, it’s a Class A Misdemeanor. Either way, threatening 2nd degree is a serious criminal charge that should be handled with the help of a top Connecticut defense attorney. For more on when Threatening 2nd is considered a felony, check out this post.

    Third, is a Verbal Threat a Crime in Connecticut?

    It can be. But, this is where experienced Connecticut defense attorneys see police and prosecutors overcharging and, in some cases, arresting people who shouldn’t be arrested at all in violation of the First Amendment. In Connecticut, you can be arrested for a verbal threat if it’s a “true threat.” That means it needs to be a “serious expression” of your intent to cause harm – it can’t be a joke or hyperbole. Check out this article for details on what’s considered a “true threat” in Connecticut.

    So, what should I do if I’m Arrested for Threatening Second Degree in Connecticut?

    If you’re facing a criminal charge, you should retain a top Connecticut criminal defense attorney. The maximum penalties for Threatening 2nd / § 53a-62 are up to five years in jail, probation, and a $5,000 fine if you’re charged with a Class D Felony and up to one year in jail, probation, and a $2,000 fine if you’re charged with a Class A Misdemeanor. With your criminal record and reputation on the line, it’s not worth going in without a Connecticut criminal defense attorney by your side.

    Call a Connecticut Threatening Second Degree Lawyer Today

    Top criminal defense attorneys in Connecticut can tell you that the crime of Threatening Second Degree is unreasonably broad and is often overcharged. Make sure your rights are protected. Make sure you get an attorney that can present all defenses and can effectively get your case resolved. Check out our certified reviews from past clients on Avvo.com. Then get in touch with the Mark Sherman Law team today at (203) 358-4700.

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