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COVID-19 Tips for Domestic Violence Victims in Connecticut

COVID-19 Tips for Domestic Violence Victims in Connecticut
  • Connecticut courts are operating on an emergency basis during the Coronavirus / COVID-19 crisis.
  • Some Connecticut courthouses remain open to protect victims of domestic violence.
  • Victims of domestic violence can still apply for 46b-15 restraining orders or report crimes to police.
  • Courts can even order temporary relief for victims of domestic violence until a hearing.
  • So if you’re a CT domestic violence victim, call a top CT domestic violence lawyer today.

Can I Still Apply for a Restraining Order during COVID-19?

Yes, victims of domestic violence can still apply for 46b-15 restraining orders and can be granted temporary relief during this time. Connecticut courts are operating on an emergency basis but are remaining open to accept and hear applications for Ex Parte Emergency Restraining Orders. Follow this link for more on the restraining order process.

Can I Still Go to Court to Apply for a Restraining Order?

Yes. Courthouses are now limiting individuals who are allowed to enter to: (1) individuals filing or who have a hearing for a Temporary Restraining Oder; (2) individuals filing or who have a hearing for a Civil Protection Order; (3) individuals filing or who have a hearing on an emergency family court motion; and (4) individuals involved in a criminal arraignment or case.

Do I Need to Go to Court to Apply for a Restraining Order?

Yes, you need to physically go to court to apply for a restraining order. The courthouses have taken major precautions to stop the spread of COVID-19, including limiting the number of people allowed in a court. If you choose file an application for a restraining order, do not bring anyone with you to court. No one will be allowed to accompany you into the building, but court staff will be available to guide you through the process. Here’s more info on going to court to make an application.

Are Court Resources Still Available for Domestic Violence Victims during COVID-19

Yes, court resources are still available for victims of domestic violence during this time. While some courthouses are temporarily closed, Connecticut has left courts open to assist domestic violence victims during this time. The Office of Family Relations and the Victim’s Advocate are still available to assist you and protect you from future violence.

Can I Speak to a Family Relations Officer as a Victim?

Yes. If You are the victim of domestic violence, you have the right to contact the Office of Family Relations to share information. The Family Relations counselor may ask you questions about a specific incident or your relationship with an offender. This gives you the chance to voice concerns and request specific steps—such as the implementation of a full no contact protective order.

Where Can I Go for a Restraining Order if the Stamford Courthouse is Closed?

Right now the Superior Courts in Norwalk and Stamford are closed and referring all emergency motions to Bridgeport Superior Court on Main Street.

What is Considered Domestic Violence in Connecticut?

 Connecticut defines domestic violence as any incident between family or household members that causes a fear of physical injury or an actual physical injury. Household members can include significant others, people who live together, family members, or people who were recently in a dating relationship. Typically, verbal arguments or abuse do not fall under this category.

Can I Hire an Attorney to Represent Me as a Domestic Violence Victim?

Yes, victims of domestic violence are entitled to representation by an attorney. An attorney can assist you in filing a report with your local police department, communicating with the court, and filing an application for a restraining order. Contact a top Connecticut domestic violence attorney to guide you through the court process.

 

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