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DCF Appeals | Here’s How to Reverse Neglect & Abuse Findings

DCF Appeals | Here’s How to Reverse Neglect & Abuse Findings
  • A DCF neglect or abuse substantiation can affect your ability to teach, coach or get a social worker / therapist license in Connecticut.
  • You can appeal a neglect and abuse substantiation against you by Connecticut’s Department of Children and Families (“DCF”).
  • You have the right to appeal DCF’s substantiation findings, especially if you’ve been placed on DCF Central Registry.

  • Appealing your substantiation can keep your record clean and can keep you off of DCF’s Central Registry.
  • Call a top Connecticut DCF Appeal lawyer attorney to appeal your DCF case.

What is a DCF Investigation Substantiation?

After a DCF investigator completes the 45-day investigation, they will issue a report as to whether or not the allegations originally made are “substantiated” or “unsubstantiated.”  If the investigator believes that you pose a physical or emotional threat to a child’s health, you will be included on DCF’s Central Registry.  DCF will also decide if you pose a risk to the physical or emotion health of the child—if so, you will be included on DCF’s Central Registry which is discoverable to the entire department and to court and law officials.

Can I Be a Teacher or Coach with a Substantiation?

Maybe not, depending on the seriousness of your case. If neglect or abuse has been substantiated against you, then this will come up on your employment background check.

When Can I Appeal a Substantiation?

You can appeal a DCF substantiation after any substantiation of abuse or neglect is made against you.  DCF can make a substantiation of abuse against you or your family based on very little evidence—sometimes even based solely on interviews with your children or other so-called witnesses.  Even though substantiations are common, they should be handled properly and aggressively defended to avoid negative impacts on your professional career and personal reputation.  Preserving your right to appeal a substantiation is important and must be done almost immediately following an investigation.  Contact any of the best Connecticut DCF defense lawyers as soon as possible to preserve this right.

What is DCF’s Central Registry?

If a DCF investigator finds that an individual is responsible for the abuse or neglect of a child, and that the individual poses a risk to the health, safety or well-being of a child, they will include that individual on DCF’s Central Registry.  While DCF’s Central Registry is only discoverable to members of the department, court and law enforcement officials, inclusion on the registry may prohibit an individual from passing an employment background check if employment involves children, such as teaching or coaching.  Inclusion on DCF’s Central Registry can also affect professional licenses.  If appealing your substantiation is key to protecting your professional career, contact an attorney as soon as possible to preserve your rights to an appeal.

How Does a DCF Investigation Begin?

DCF can launch an investigation any time there is a report of suspected abuse or neglect.  Sometimes these investigations stem from domestic violence arrests, where a child was present in the home at the time of the arrest, or from reports made by mandated reporters such as school teachers or therapists.  A DCF investigator will contact you if a report is made, to meet with you and your children.  DCF investigations can last up to 45 days, and may continue past the 45 days depending on DCF’s findings.  Read more about DCF investigations here.

Contact a Top DCF Defense Attorney Today

If you are the subject of a DCF investigation, or DCF has substantiated abuse or neglect against you, contact an experienced DCF defense attorney today to discuss your options and learn how you can preserve your record and keep yourself off of DCF’s Central Registry.  Call the team of attorneys at Mark Sherman Law today at (203) 358-4700, and click here to read hundreds of certified reviews on Avvo.com.

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