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Fact: Self-Defense Against Police Brutality is NOT Assault on Police in Connecticut

Fact: Self-Defense Against Police Brutality is NOT Assault on Police in Connecticut
  • There’s a difference between self-defense and assaulting a police officer.
  • You have the right to protect yourself from aggressive police officers.
  • Assault on a Police Officer / § 53a-167c is a felony charge in Connecticut.
  • Top Connecticut criminal lawyers often see Assault on a Police Officer charges added on when they shouldn’t be.
  • Keep reading to learn how to get Connecticut Assault on Police Officer charges dismissed.
  • If you were arrested for Assault on a Police Officer, be sure to contact a top Connecticut criminal attorney.

I Didn’t Hit Anyone.  Why am I Charged with Assault on a Police Officer?

The best Connecticut criminal defense lawyers see it way too often – police officers get rough while making an arrest, you try to defend yourself or resist, and all of the sudden your case goes from a misdemeanor Interfering with an Officer arrest to the serious felony charge of Assault on a Police Officer, even if you never hit anyone.  If you’re facing an Assault on a Police Officer arrest, be sure to contact an experienced criminal attorney who can carefully review your case and all available body camera footage to build your defense.

How Can I Fight a Connecticut Assault on a Police Officer Arrest?

Because police officers often tack this charge on when there just isn’t enough evidence, your defense attorney will work with you to carefully review all of the evidence that the prosecution claims to have against you, including reports and body cameras.  Your attorney should look to see if there’s any evidence that you intended to interfere with the officer and if anyone was actually injured.  Experienced attorneys in Connecticut know to immediately file motions to preserve any evidence that may help you, like surveillance footage if it’s available.

What is Assault on a Police Officer in Connecticut? 

Assault on a Police Officer, found at Connecticut criminal law § 53a-167c, is a broad charge that covers not only police officers but also firefighters, emergency medical services personnel, Department of Corrections employees, health care employees, and other officials.  If you’re accused of trying to interfere with any one of these people during their official job duties and you cause an injury to them, throw something at them, or use an object against them, you may find yourself defending an Assault on a Police Officer arrest in Connecticut court.

Is Assault on a Police Officer a Felony in Connecticut?

Yes.  If you are arrested for Assault on a Police Officer in Connecticut, then you are facing a Class C Felony. With such a serious charge, be sure to reach out to an experienced criminal defense lawyer in Connecticut to build your defense.

What are the Penalties for Assault on an Officer Arrests in Connecticut?

If you’re facing an arrest for Assault on a Police Officer in Connecticut, you are exposed to significant penalties, including up to ten years in jail, a fine of up to $10,000, and a period of probation.  

My Connecticut Assault on a Peace Officer Arrest is Online.  Can I Get it Down?

Unfortunately, everything is published online these days, including arrests – even when there’s no guilty plea or conviction.  We understand that publication of an arrest, especially if your case is dismissed and you have moved on, can be devastating to your professional and personal reputation.  Check out this post for more on our Internet Scrubbing practice.

Call an Experienced Connecticut Assault on a Police Officer Attorney Today

Felony arrests for Assault on a Police Officer in Connecticut are not only serious, but often aren’t supported by the facts.  If you’re arrested for Assault on an Officer in CT, be sure to contact a team of lawyers experienced in Connecticut courts.  You can see hundreds of reviews from past clients at Avvo.com.  Then get in touch today at (203) 358-4700.

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