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Connecticut Voyeurism Lawyer

Were you arrested in CT for voyeurism? A Connecticut voyeurism lawyer could raise a strong defense and fight for a positive resolution on your behalf.

What is Voyeurism in Connecticut?

Under Connecticut General Statutes (C.G.S.) §53a-189a, someone commits voyeurism when:

  • They maliciously film, photograph, or record the image of a person in circumstances where that person has a reasonable expectation of privacy;
  • While intending to arouse or satisfy a sexual desire, they film, photograph, or record an image of an individual in circumstances where that person has a reasonable expectation of privacy;
  • While intending to arouse or satisfy a sexual desire, they trespass and watch someone in their home under circumstances where that person has a reasonable expectation of privacy;
  • While intending to arouse or satisfy a sexual desire, they film, photograph, or record an image of someone’s genital areas while those body parts are not in plain view and covered by no more than undergarments.

A Connecticut voyeurism lawyer could work to show that one or more required elements of a violation are lacking in a case.

What is the Role of State of Mind in a Voyeurism Case?

In each of the four scenarios described in the statute, the person recording an image or observing another without consent must be acting with a particular state of mind to be found guilty. Therefore, a Connecticut voyeurism lawyer could look for evidence to show that the person accused acted with a different intent or none at all.

For a violation to occur, the person charged must be acting with intent to gratify their own or others’ sexual desires, or they must act with “malice.” A skilled attorney can analyze your case to argue that you were not acting with malice.

What are the Penalties for Voyeurism?

Voyeurism is considered a Class D felony unless aggravating circumstances apply. Penalties can include up to five years of imprisonment and a fine of up to $5,000. If the individual charged has prior convictions for this or certain other offenses, then the severity escalates to a Class C felony. Recording or observing a person under the age of 16 will also cause the offense to be classified as a Class C felony. The maximum fine and prison sentence double in those scenarios.

Disseminating material obtained through voyeuristic acts is also separate a felony offense under C.G.S. § 53a-189b . In addition to the potential for imprisonment and hefty fines, those convicted of any of these offenses will have a criminal record and social stigma that could haunt them for years to come.

Work with an Experienced Connecticut Voyeurism Attorney

If you have been accused of actions that could be prosecuted as voyeurism, it is a good idea to start preparing a defense strategy immediately. A Connecticut voyeurism lawyer could review your situation and explain your options. To learn more about how an experienced attorney could help, call now for a free consultation.